Captain America Wiki

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| caption =
 
| caption =
 
| alt =
 
| alt =
| director = [[Elmer Clifton]]<br>[[John English]]
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| director = [[Ivan Nagy (director)|Ivan Nagy]]
 
| producer =
 
| producer =
  +
| writer = Wilton Schiller
| writer = '''Story:'''<br />Royal Cole<br />[[Harry Fraser]]<br />[[Joseph Poland]]<br />[[Ronald Davidson]]<br />[[Basil Dickey]]<br />[[Jesse Duffy]]<br />[[Grant Nelson]]
 
| starring = [[Dick Purcell]]
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| starring = [[Reb Brown]]
| music = [[Mort Glickman]]
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| music =
| cinematography = [[John MacBurnie]]
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| cinematography =
| editing = [[Wallace Grissell]]<br />[[Earl Turner]]
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| editing =
 
| studio =
 
| studio =
| distributor = [[Republic Pictures]]
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| distributor = [[CBS]]
| runtime = 243 minutes
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| runtime = 83 minutes
| num_episodes = 15 chapters
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| num_episodes = 2
 
| country = United States
 
| country = United States
 
| language = English
 
| language = English
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==Production==
 
==Production==
''Captain America'' was budgeted at $182,623 although the final [[negative cost]] was $222,906 (a $40,283, or 22.1%, overspend). It was the most expensive of all Republic serials (as well as the most over budget).<ref name="mathis">{{cite book
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''Captain America'' was budgeted at $182,623 although the final [[negative cost]] was $222,906 (a $40,283, or 22.1%, overspend). It was the most expensive of all Republic serials (as well as the most over budget).<ref name="mathis">{{cite book
 
| last = Mathis
 
| last = Mathis
 
| first = Jack
 
| first = Jack
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| pages = 3, 10, 74–75
 
| pages = 3, 10, 74–75
 
| chapter =
 
| chapter =
}}</ref> It was filmed between October 12 and November 24, 1943.<ref name="mathis" /> The serial's production number was 1297.<ref name="mathis" /> ''Captain America'' was written by seven of the top serial screenwriters, including [[Harry L. Fraser|Harry Fraser]]’s only work at Republic.<ref>{{cite book
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}}</ref> It was filmed between October 12 and November 24, 1943.<ref name="mathis" /> The serial's production number was 1297.<ref name="mathis" /> ''Captain America'' was written by seven of the top serial screenwriters, including [[Harry L. Fraser|Harry Fraser]]’s only work at Republic.<ref>{{cite book
 
| last = Cline
 
| last = Cline
 
| first = William C.
 
| first = William C.
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}}</ref>
 
}}</ref>
   
The Captain America costume was really grey, white and dark blue as these colours photographed better in black and white. The costume also lost the wings on the head, the pirate boots became high shoes and the chainmail became normal cloth. Miniature flags were added to the gloves and the belt buckle became a small shield.<ref name="GMS">{{cite book
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The Captain America costume was really grey, white and dark blue as these colours photographed better in black and white. The costume also lost the wings on the head, the pirate boots became high shoes and the chainmail became normal cloth. Miniature flags were added to the gloves and the belt buckle became a small shield.<ref name="GMS">{{cite book
 
| last = Harmon
 
| last = Harmon
 
| first = Jim
 
| first = Jim
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}}</ref>
 
}}</ref>
   
Republic was notorious for making arbitrary changes in their adaptations. This occurred with ''Captain America'' more than most. [[Timely Comics|Timely]], the owner of Captain America, was unhappy with the omission of Steve Rogers, the lack of an army setting and his use of a gun. Republic responded in writing that the sample pages provided by Timely did not indicate that Captain America was a soldier called Steve Rogers, nor that he did not carry a revolver. They also noted that the serial was well into production by this point and they could not return to the original concept without expensive retakes and dubbing. Finally they pointed out that Republic was under no contractual obligation to do any of this.
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Republic was notorious for making arbitrary changes in their adaptations. This occurred with ''Captain America'' more than most. [[Timely Comics|Timely]], the owner of Captain America, was unhappy with the omission of Steve Rogers, the lack of an army setting and his use of a gun. Republic responded in writing that the sample pages provided by Timely did not indicate that Captain America was a soldier called Steve Rogers, nor that he did not carry a revolver. They also noted that the serial was well into production by this point and they could not return to the original concept without expensive retakes and dubbing. Finally they pointed out that Republic was under no contractual obligation to do any of this.
   
The differences between the comic book and film versions of the title character in this serial are more extreme than with other Republic comic adaptations, such as ''Adventures of Captain Marvel'' and ''Spy Smasher''. For example:
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The differences between the comic book and film versions of the title character in this serial are more extreme than with other Republic comic adaptations, such as ''Adventures of Captain Marvel'' and ''Spy Smasher''. For example:
*His secret identity is District Attorney Grant Gardner rather than [[United States Army|U.S. Army]] Private Steve Rogers.
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*His secret identity is District Attorney Grant Gardner rather than [[United States Army|U.S. Army]] Private Steve Rogers.
 
*The "Super-Soldier Serum" origin is not used.
 
*The "Super-Soldier Serum" origin is not used.
 
*His famous [[shield]] does not appear, replaced by a standard gun.
 
*His famous [[shield]] does not appear, replaced by a standard gun.
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*His sidekick, [[Bucky]], does not appear.
 
*His sidekick, [[Bucky]], does not appear.
   
The reason for the differences appears not to be arbitrary, but that the script for the serial originally featured an entirely different licensed lead character and it was only decided later to replace the original character with Captain America. Film historians Jim Harmon and Don Glut speculated that the script was originally written as a sequel to 1940's ''Mysterious Doctor Satan'', which featured the masked hero The Copperhead. This character was himself a substitution for DC's Superman, after Republic's bid for that character's film rights lost to [[Paramount Pictures|Paramount]], who had a series of cartoon shorts made by the Fleischer Studios, and would later on acquire Republic, as well as release a [[Captain America: The First Avenger|feature-length Captain America film]]. This idea, however, is highly questionable considering that Republic owned the Copperhead character and could have done as they pleased with him without any licensing issues.
+
The reason for the differences appears not to be arbitrary, but that the script for the serial originally featured an entirely different licensed lead character and it was only decided later to replace the original character with Captain America. Film historians Jim Harmon and Don Glut speculated that the script was originally written as a sequel to 1940's ''Mysterious Doctor Satan'', which featured the masked hero The Copperhead. This character was himself a substitution for DC's Superman, after Republic's bid for that character's film rights lost to [[Paramount Pictures|Paramount]], who had a series of cartoon shorts made by the Fleischer Studios, and would later on acquire Republic, as well as release a [[Captain America: The First Avenger|feature-length Captain America film]]. This idea, however, is highly questionable considering that Republic owned the Copperhead character and could have done as they pleased with him without any licensing issues.
   
Republic previously had adapted [awcett Comics characters (Captain Marvel and Spy Smasher). Due to the fact that the lead in ''Captain America'' is a crime-fighting district attorney aided by a female secretary who knows his identity, and that the serial includes a chapter entitled "The Scarlet Shroud" in which nothing scarlet appears, film restoration director Eric Stedman suggests that it is more likely that the script was originally developed to feature Fawcett's comic book hero [[Mr. Scarlet]], secretly D.A. Brian Butler, whose comic book appearances had proved unpopular and who had actually disappeared from comic book covers and been relegated to being a backup feature between the time the serial was planned and the final film produced.
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Republic previously had adapted [awcett Comics characters (Captain Marvel and Spy Smasher). Due to the fact that the lead in ''Captain America'' is a crime-fighting district attorney aided by a female secretary who knows his identity, and that the serial includes a chapter entitled "The Scarlet Shroud" in which nothing scarlet appears, film restoration director Eric Stedman suggests that it is more likely that the script was originally developed to feature Fawcett's comic book hero [[Mr. Scarlet]], secretly D.A. Brian Butler, whose comic book appearances had proved unpopular and who had actually disappeared from comic book covers and been relegated to being a backup feature between the time the serial was planned and the final film produced.
   
 
Writer Raymond William Stedman believes that the differences between the comic-book and film versions of Captain America were "for the better" as, for example, the hero did not have to sneak out of an army base every time he needed to change identities.<ref name="stedman">{{cite book
 
Writer Raymond William Stedman believes that the differences between the comic-book and film versions of Captain America were "for the better" as, for example, the hero did not have to sneak out of an army base every time he needed to change identities.<ref name="stedman">{{cite book
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*Tom Steele
 
*Tom Steele
   
Dale Van Sickel was the "ram rod" of the stunt crew, doubling Dick Purcell as Captain America. Ken Terrell doubled George J. Lewis and Fred Graham doubled Lionel Atwill. Additional stunts were performed by Duke Green and Joe Yrigoyen. Tom Steele only appeared in chapter one as he was busy on The Masked Marvel.<ref name="GMS" />
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Dale Van Sickel was the "ram rod" of the stunt crew, doubling Dick Purcell as Captain America. Ken Terrell doubled George J. Lewis and Fred Graham doubled Lionel Atwill. Additional stunts were performed by Duke Green and Joe Yrigoyen. Tom Steele only appeared in chapter one as he was busy on The Masked Marvel.<ref name="GMS" />
   
 
===Special effects===
 
===Special effects===

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